6 Important Things to Keep in Mind Before Accepting your Next Job Offer

6 Important Things to Keep in Mind Before Accepting your Next Job Offer

It is so tempting to simply say yes once you get accepted into a position that you applied for, but you have to keep in mind that these decisions must be well thought of—not impulsive. You need have to weigh out different factors and situations in order to make sure that the offer you have is the best fit for you and your needs. Keep in mind that more often than not, as soon as you accept the offer, you can no longer change the terms of your employment.

Indeed, wages and benefits are the biggest considerations you must have, but when making a decision, you must not limit yourselves to only those two options. You must also take into account the intricacies of the contract and its terms and conditions before arriving at any decision to accept the job. Especially for people in the field of IT practice, they are not so good with words and business contracts because of little to no exposure to them. Having said that, we have compiled six things you must take note of before saying yes to that job offer.

1. IS THE COMPANY A GOOD FIT FOR YOU?

Remember, don’t get your emotions get the best of you. You have to think about the effects of going with a certain enterprise, as well as the level of training and learning you will be getting from it. Based on experience though, training in a corporate setup is more likely to be more thorough, bringing better value and knowledge to employees. You also have to consider how your current choice will affect your future employments, and therefore, you must make sure that it will be able to equip you with sufficient technical know-how to stand out in your future endeavors.

2. DOES THE OFFER GIVE YOU AN APPROPRIATE SALARY AND SUPPORTING PACKAGE?

More often than not, small IT companies will either give you a low offer as a start (if they see potential in you) or a high one (if they think you are vital to their success). In some lucky scenarios, the company makes it big and you made the right choice choosing that firm. But, what if that doesn’t happen? Well, that’s the risk you must be willing to take. You also have to take note of genuinely significant benefits and additional features that these small companies offer you before deciding to go with them. 

On the flip side, large firms will most probably give you a reasonable salary based on what the tech industry offers, and this will grow slowly as the value you bring to the company increases accordingly. To many, these companies is your safest bet. However, if some offers are too good to be true, you have to make sure that you catch on this and clarify them. Remember that it is fine to ask questions and opinions from others before arriving at a final decision, especially if you want to know more about the supporting aspects of the package like health cover; pension; share options; car allowance, and the like. 

3. IS THE JOB GOOD FOR YOU AT THE LONG TERM?

You have to make sure the job you take is sustainable for you at the long term, and so, you have to factor in job satisfaction and the personal happiness that it brings you. With this, you have to ask yourself, do the values of the company resonate with your personal beliefs? Is the company culture healthy and amenable for you?

4. DOES THE ROLE COINCIDE WITH YOUR PERSONALITY AND SKILL SET?

Some people fall into the trap of taking jobs that are outside of their strengths and skill sets. Accepting a job simply beyond you may lead to unwanted professional consequences that are hard to recover from, especially if you fail

5. EXAMINE THE CONTRACT AND ITS TERMS METICULOUSLY

From the get-go, you have to establish that you’ll only formally accept the offer once you have read the contract in detail. If you do not understand some of the terms and conditions stated, remember that seeking professional help from those around you won’t hurt at all!

Regardless of whether you accept the offer or not, make sure that you’re able to respond formally and professionally to your employer before the deadline. Typically, offers are valid ten days after the initial offer was extended.

6. GET EVERYTHING IN WRITING AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE

Asking for a written offer before the issue of the actual contract (which usually takes a few days) is reasonable on your end as an employee because this puts everything you’ve discussed with your employer into writing—essentially protecting you and your rights.